Posture, its not what you do its the way that you do it!
A disc prolapse, also known as a herniated disc or slipped disc, occurs when the outer layer of the intervertebral disc ruptures and the inner gel-like substance bulges out, potentially compressing nearby nerve roots or the spinal cord. This condition can result in a range of symptoms, including pain, numbness, tingling, and weakness in the affected limb, as well as lower back pain and stiffness.

 

The management of a disc prolapse typically includes a combination of non-surgical and surgical options. Non-surgical management includes osteopathic treatment, exercise rehabilitation, and medication to control pain and inflammation. Exercise rehabilitation, in particular, plays a crucial role in the recovery and prevention of a disc prolapse.

A systematic review by Gajraj et al. (2015) found that exercise rehabilitation can be effective in reducing pain and improving functional outcomes in individuals with a disc prolapse. The review included 11 randomized controlled trials and found that supervised exercise programs, including strengthening and flexibility exercises, were associated with significant improvements in pain, disability, and functional outcomes.

Another systematic review by Hides et al. (2001) found that specific exercises are effective in reducing pain and improving functional outcomes in individuals with a disc prolapse. McKenzie exercises often applied for specific conditions gradually increases extension movement to the lumbar spine, with the goal of centralizing pain and improving functional abilities.

In addition to specific exercises, core stability exercises are also beneficial for individuals with a disc prolapse. A randomized controlled trial by Cholewicki et al. (2004) found that a core stability exercise program, including exercises for the transversus abdominis and lumbar multifidus muscles, resulted in significant improvements in pain, disability, and trunk muscle endurance in individuals with a disc prolapse.

Exercise rehabilitation should be tailored to the individual and should be supervised by a qualified healthcare professional, such as a physiotherapist. Additionally, it is important to note that exercise rehabilitation should not be initiated during the acute phase of a disc prolapse, as this may exacerbate symptoms.

In conclusion, exercise rehabilitation plays a crucial role in the recovery and prevention of a disc prolapse. Combining treatment with supervised exercise programs, including strengthening and flexibility exercises, and core stability exercises are effective in reducing pain and improving functional outcomes in individuals with a disc prolapse. Exercise rehabilitation should be tailored to the individual and supervised by a qualified healthcare professional.

References:

  • Gajraj, N. M., Dziedzic, K. S., & Croft, P. R. (2015). Exercise therapy for the management of non-specific low back pain. The Cochrane Library.
  • Hides, J. A., Richardson, C. A., & Jull, G. A. (2001). Multifidus muscle recovery is not automatic after resolution of acute, first-episode low back pain. Spine, 26(8), E243-E248.